Online Collection

Collections



Asian Art Museum Logo
Thakur Sirdar Singh worshiping a four-faced linga
Place of Origin: India, Udaipur, Rajasthan state, former kingdom of Mewar
Date: 1740
Materials: Opaque watercolors on paper
Dimensions: H. 14 1/2 in x W. 9 in, H. 36.7 cm x W. 23.5 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Mr. and Mrs. George Hopper Fitch
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: B84D2
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Thakur Sirdar Singh was the ruler of a small principality in Rajasthan that was associated with the powerful kingdom of Mewar. The title thakur indicates his status as a member of the local ruling nobility. Holding a flower offering in his right hand and a bell in his left, he is shown in a lakeside pavilion performing a private religious ceremony. The three boys sitting opposite him and the young girl standing beside a woman just outside the pavilion may represent his children. Sirdar Singh's worship is directed toward what appears to be a four-faced linga representing the Hindu god Shiva. Near the linga is a small image of Nandi, the devoted bull and animal mount of the god.

Little is known about the manuscript from which this page comes; only five pages, including this one, are known. The identification of the main figure as Sirdar Singh is possible because one of the surviving pages-now in a London collection-includes an inscription that also gives the artist's name and date. Paintings of Mewar nobles began to be produced in significant numbers around the middle of the eighteenth century, reflecting their increasing independence from their overlords, who ruled from the capital city of Udaipur.


Label:

Thakur Sirdar Singh was the ruler of a small principality in Rajasthan that was associated with the powerful kingdom of Mewar. The title thakur indicates his status as a member of the local ruling nobility. Holding a flower offering in his right hand and a bell in his left, he is shown in a lakeside pavilion performing a private religious ceremony. The three boys sitting opposite him and the young girl standing beside a woman just outside the pavilion may represent his children. Sirdar Singh's worship is directed toward what appears to be a four-faced linga representing the Hindu god Shiva. Near the linga is a small image of Nandi, the devoted bull and animal mount of the god.

Little is known about the manuscript from which this page comes; only five pages, including this one, are known. The identification of the main figure as Sirdar Singh is possible because one of the surviving pages-now in a London collection-includes an inscription that also gives the artist's name and date. Paintings of Mewar nobles began to be produced in significant numbers around the middle of the eighteenth century, reflecting their increasing independence from their overlords, who ruled from the capital city of Udaipur.