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The Hindu god Krishna gazes into a mirror held by his consort, from a Rasikapriya (Handbook for Poetry Connoisseurs) series
Place of Origin: India, Rajasthan state, former kingdom of Bikaner
Date: 1749
Materials: Opaque watercolors and gold on paper
Dimensions: H. 10 1/4 in x W. 7 5/8 in, H. 26.0 cm x W. 19.4 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Elton L. Puffer
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: 2004.51
On Display: No

Description

Label: This page comes from a series illustrating a well-known sixteenth-century poetic treatise on love, a popular theme of Indian paintings. The Hindu deity Krishna and his consort Radha appear in the Rasikapriya text as ideal lovers. Radha holds up a mirror for Krishna, whose face is reflected in it. In Indian art, the mirror has two meanings: associations with beauty and vanity, and reflections of the relationship between god and the human soul. Here the mirror plays on both references, reflecting the Absolute Reality underlying the universe (in the person of Krishna). An inscription on the reverse of the painting identifies the artist as Qayam, son of the painter Murad.

Label: This page comes from a series illustrating a well-known sixteenth-century poetic treatise on love, a popular theme of Indian paintings. The Hindu deity Krishna and his consort Radha appear in the Rasikapriya text as ideal lovers. Radha holds up a mirror for Krishna, whose face is reflected in it. In Indian art, the mirror has two meanings: associations with beauty and vanity, and reflections of the relationship between god and the human soul. Here the mirror plays on both references, reflecting the Absolute Reality underlying the universe (in the person of Krishna). An inscription on the reverse of the painting identifies the artist as Qayam, son of the painter Murad.