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A man kneeling before an ascetic accompanied by a dog
Place of Origin: Northern India
Date: 1600-1610
Materials: Opaque watercolors on paper
Style or Ware: Mughal
Dimensions: H. 12 5/8 in x W. 8 in, H. 32.1 cm x W. 20.3 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Margaret Polak
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: 1988.27
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Various paintings produced under the Muslim Mughal dynasty (1526-1858) depict Hindu religious figures such as the one shown standing in this painting. The bearded man can be identified as a yogi, a member of a religious order that emphasized the renunciation of worldly pleasures and the strict practice of yogic and meditative postures. His shawl, staff, round bag, and pet dog are found in other paintings depicting yogis, but he lacks other attributes that could assist in identifying his specific affiliation. An inscription below the feet of the yogi names Shankar as the artist. Shankar's work is found in several imperial manuscripts produced under the emperors Akbar (1556-1605) and Jahangir (1605-1628).

In addition to Hindu yogis—male and female—Jain monks and Muslim Sufi dervishes were also depicted in Mughal paintings. The Mughals and many of their contemporaries were fascinated by these religious figures, who were thought to possess great spiritual powers.


More Information

Inscriptions: Inscribed in nasta'liq script, at base of painting: "Amal Shankar" ("work of Shankar")
Label:

Various paintings produced under the Muslim Mughal dynasty (1526-1858) depict Hindu religious figures such as the one shown standing in this painting. The bearded man can be identified as a yogi, a member of a religious order that emphasized the renunciation of worldly pleasures and the strict practice of yogic and meditative postures. His shawl, staff, round bag, and pet dog are found in other paintings depicting yogis, but he lacks other attributes that could assist in identifying his specific affiliation. An inscription below the feet of the yogi names Shankar as the artist. Shankar's work is found in several imperial manuscripts produced under the emperors Akbar (1556-1605) and Jahangir (1605-1628).

In addition to Hindu yogis—male and female—Jain monks and Muslim Sufi dervishes were also depicted in Mughal paintings. The Mughals and many of their contemporaries were fascinated by these religious figures, who were thought to possess great spiritual powers.


Inscriptions: Inscribed in nasta'liq script, at base of painting: "Amal Shankar" ("work of Shankar")