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Thakur Jait Singh (1757-1824) of Badnore hunting boar
Date: approx. 1810-1815
Materials: Opaque watercolors on paper
Style or Ware: Badnore
Dimensions: H. 15 3/8 in x W. 12 1/8 in, H. 39.1 cm x W. 30.8 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Gursharan and Elvira Sidhu
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: 1991.253
On Display: No

Description

Label:

Thakur Jait Singh was ruler of a small principality in Rajasthan that was associated with the powerful kingdom of Mewar. The title thakur indicates his status as a member of the local ruling nobility.

This portrait of Jait Singh resembles contemporary portraits of the Mewar king in its stocky figural forms, stylized facial features, and bold colors. In subject matter as well as style, paintings depicting feudal lords differed little from those depicting their superiors. Hunting scenes and equestrian portraits, for instance, were common forms of depiction for both lords and kings, reflecting the shared cultural heritage of the ruling classes. Among Rajputs, the lineage group from which Hindu kings and nobility claimed descent, hunting was a traditional pastime that reflected valor and prowess. Hunting boar on horseback was considered particularly useful in developing strong equestrian skills. Although this might appear to be a stock portrait, it is in fact a telling document of Rajput life, ancestry, and values.


More Information

Exhibition History: Princes, Palaces and Passion: The Art of India's Mewar Kingdon (Feb. 2 - April 29, 2007)
Label:

Thakur Jait Singh was ruler of a small principality in Rajasthan that was associated with the powerful kingdom of Mewar. The title thakur indicates his status as a member of the local ruling nobility.

This portrait of Jait Singh resembles contemporary portraits of the Mewar king in its stocky figural forms, stylized facial features, and bold colors. In subject matter as well as style, paintings depicting feudal lords differed little from those depicting their superiors. Hunting scenes and equestrian portraits, for instance, were common forms of depiction for both lords and kings, reflecting the shared cultural heritage of the ruling classes. Among Rajputs, the lineage group from which Hindu kings and nobility claimed descent, hunting was a traditional pastime that reflected valor and prowess. Hunting boar on horseback was considered particularly useful in developing strong equestrian skills. Although this might appear to be a stock portrait, it is in fact a telling document of Rajput life, ancestry, and values.


Exhibition History: Princes, Palaces and Passion: The Art of India's Mewar Kingdon (Feb. 2 - April 29, 2007)