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Maharaja Sher Singh
Portraits of The Princes and People of India
Date: 1844
Object Name: Chromolithograph
Materials: Hand-painted chromolithograph on paper
Dimensions: H. 22 in x W. 17 1/2 in, H. 55.9 cm x W. 44.4 cm
Credit Line: Gift of the Kapany Collection
Department: South Asian Art
Collection: Prints And Drawings
Object Number: 1998.63.2
On Display: No
Culture: Sikh

Description

Label: Emily Eden, an English amateur artist, is responsible for many well-known paintings of the most celebrated members of the Sikh courts. In December 1838 she and her sister were guests of Maharaja Ranjit Singh in Amritsar and Lahore over a period of two weeks. The Edens dined daily with Sher Singh (reigned 1841–1843), Ranjit Singh’s son, who was assigned as their host. Here we see Sher Singh represented in European style, posed rather casually on a throne and footstool, clothed elegantly and with regal aplomb. Sher Singh was known for his handsome, robust physical appearance and tendency to appear sumptuously adorned at court. Some items of his personal jewelry, like many other renowned valuables of the Sikh courts, were dispersed, auctioned, or directly taken by the British government following the Anglo-Sikh Wars, making their way to the British royal family collections.

More Information

Inscriptions: Print Sellers by Special Appointment to Her Majesty and H.R.H. the Duchess of Kent
Exhibition History: "Saints and Kings: Arts, Culture, and Legacy of the Sikhs", Asian Art Museum, 3/10/2017 - 6/18/2017
Label: Emily Eden, an English amateur artist, is responsible for many well-known paintings of the most celebrated members of the Sikh courts. In December 1838 she and her sister were guests of Maharaja Ranjit Singh in Amritsar and Lahore over a period of two weeks. The Edens dined daily with Sher Singh (reigned 1841–1843), Ranjit Singh’s son, who was assigned as their host. Here we see Sher Singh represented in European style, posed rather casually on a throne and footstool, clothed elegantly and with regal aplomb. Sher Singh was known for his handsome, robust physical appearance and tendency to appear sumptuously adorned at court. Some items of his personal jewelry, like many other renowned valuables of the Sikh courts, were dispersed, auctioned, or directly taken by the British government following the Anglo-Sikh Wars, making their way to the British royal family collections.
Inscriptions: Print Sellers by Special Appointment to Her Majesty and H.R.H. the Duchess of Kent
Exhibition History: "Saints and Kings: Arts, Culture, and Legacy of the Sikhs", Asian Art Museum, 3/10/2017 - 6/18/2017