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Woman's upper garment (kegal)
Place of Origin: Philippines, Mindanao
Date: approx. 1950
Materials: Cotton, sequins, buttons
Dimensions: H. 16 3/4 in x W. 49 1/2 in, H. 42.6 cm x W. 125.7 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Jack and Milka Wigfield
Department: Southeast Asian Art
Collection: Textiles
Object Number: F2009.31.2
On Display: Yes
Location: Tateuchi Thematic Gallery
Culture: T'boli people

Description

Label: The T’boli women are famous for their blouses decorated with embroidery, appliqué, and sequins. Women still wear these on important occasions such as weddings or community celebrations, but the maintenance of old customs is increasingly difficult. Many of the highland Mindanao communities have been deeply impacted by loss of land and the influx of migrants from other regions of the Philippines. The negotiation between older ways of life and the culture of urban society is constant. The T’boli have had success in building tourist networks to help maintain traditional customs, including music, dance, and textile production. Weavers have formed cooperatives and have crowdfunded for the marketing of their textiles, which are now sewn into contemporary clothing, accessories, and housewares. The School for Living Traditions near Lake Sebu promotes the arts and culture of the region by providing classes to local students.

More Information

Exhibition History: "Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories", Asian Art Museum, 7/14/2017 - 3/11/2018
Label: The T’boli women are famous for their blouses decorated with embroidery, appliqué, and sequins. Women still wear these on important occasions such as weddings or community celebrations, but the maintenance of old customs is increasingly difficult. Many of the highland Mindanao communities have been deeply impacted by loss of land and the influx of migrants from other regions of the Philippines. The negotiation between older ways of life and the culture of urban society is constant. The T’boli have had success in building tourist networks to help maintain traditional customs, including music, dance, and textile production. Weavers have formed cooperatives and have crowdfunded for the marketing of their textiles, which are now sewn into contemporary clothing, accessories, and housewares. The School for Living Traditions near Lake Sebu promotes the arts and culture of the region by providing classes to local students.
Exhibition History: "Philippine Art: Collecting Art, Collecting Memories", Asian Art Museum, 7/14/2017 - 3/11/2018