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Pair of calligraphy scrolls
Place of Origin: Korea
Date: approx. 1830-1850
Historical Period: Joseon dynasty (1392-1910)
Object Name: Hanging scroll
Materials: Ink on paper
Dimensions: H. 81 in x W. 17 in, H. 205.7 cm x W. 43.2 cm (overall); H. 56 1/2 in x W. 10 1/2 in, H. 143.5 cm x W. 26.7 cm (image)
Credit Line: Gift of Arthur J. McTaggart
Department: Korean Art
Collection: Painting
Object Number: 1997.25.1-.2
On Display: Yes
Location: Gallery 23

Description

Label: In my writing, meaning and composition follow no method;
In this aging heart, there ever exist poems.


This pair of scrolls exemplifies the artist Kim Jeonghui's creative interpretation of traditional calligraphic styles. His calligraphy is bold and decisive, yet carefully controlled. Kim Jeonghui, a Renaissance man of the nineteenth century, was one of the most eminent figures in the history of Korea. He was a prominent scholar with numerous followers, an upright politician who was exiled several times for his views, and an astute connoisseur with a grand art collection, as well as an art critic and artist. Kim, whose pen name was Chusa, was interested in new calligraphic trends in China. He is respected for having created his own “Chusa” style of calligraphy, which was not only highly influential in Korea but was also respected by contemporaneous Chinese and Japanese scholars. The two rectangular seals on the left line are Kim’s pen name and name.
Label: In my writing, meaning and composition follow no method;
In this aging heart, there ever exist poems.


This pair of scrolls exemplifies the artist Kim Jeonghui's creative interpretation of traditional calligraphic styles. His calligraphy is bold and decisive, yet carefully controlled. Kim Jeonghui, a Renaissance man of the nineteenth century, was one of the most eminent figures in the history of Korea. He was a prominent scholar with numerous followers, an upright politician who was exiled several times for his views, and an astute connoisseur with a grand art collection, as well as an art critic and artist. Kim, whose pen name was Chusa, was interested in new calligraphic trends in China. He is respected for having created his own “Chusa” style of calligraphy, which was not only highly influential in Korea but was also respected by contemporaneous Chinese and Japanese scholars. The two rectangular seals on the left line are Kim’s pen name and name.